It is currently Sat Sep 21, 2019 1:16 pm


Register for Windows Forums


New posts Register

Register for Windows Forums now to gain access to: post messages, download free books, competitions for great prizes, and get to know others. Members also see NO ADVERTS. Join today!




 Page 1 of 2 [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Message Author
 
 Post subject: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 6:53 pm 

Hi guys.

About to get cable internet (I currently have ADSL 2+) and am needing some suggestions on the routers/modems.

I currently have a Dlink 2740B which is not cable and the plan I am getting comes with a basic non-wireless modem so I was thinking I'd just attach my current one to that to broadcast wireless. I know this is a bit of a stupid question but I need to make sure before I make the switch. It's an extra $120 for the wireless one so if I can just attach it'll be much better.

Thanks in advance.



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Highly Valued Member
Highly Valued Member

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 1:45 am
Posts: 191
Thanks given: 38 times
Thanks received: 19 times
Location: Australia
OS: 8 RT
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 7:06 pm 
For this post the author Makcalable has received gratitude : jumper918

I think if your not happy with the basic one you get from service internet provider you may want look to get a new one not sure what your price range is but take a look at this if i understand what your asking i dont think it would benefit you in any way, if at all possible with the set up you are talking about. :?

Jumper is this what you were meaning here



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Top Content Contributor
Top Content Contributor

Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 7:20 pm
Posts: 565
Thanks given: 47 times
Thanks received: 132 times
Location: UK
OS: 8 RT
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2010 9:58 pm 
For this post the author GoodBytes has received gratitude : jumper918

Bugsy, many ISP only provides you with a modem, which is, in my opinion, the best setup. As usually the routers+modem combo, usually the router is a joke.

Every router has it's strength or weaknesses. It is important to read reviews on the router. Some routers are better wired, other better on wireless, features.
Here is a review of yours: http://www.trustedreviews.com/networkin ... L-2740B/p1


Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Frequent Member
Frequent Member

Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:04 pm
Posts: 40
Thanks given: 2 times
Thanks received: 8 times
Location: Montreal
OS: 8 Pro
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:12 pm 
For this post the author Rich has received gratitude : jumper918

I don't think you'll be able to link the Dlink 2740B to your new modem as it has an ASDL in (not Ethernet, which is what the modem you get from your provider will put out.)

You should pick up an inexpensive router and connect the router, via Ethernet, to your new cable modem. If they provide one, I would get a dedicated Modem from your provider and not a combo (as others have said, the combos don't perform that well.)



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Site Admin
Site Admin
Windows Guru²
Windows Guru²

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 8:33 pm
Posts: 2813
Thanks given: 424 times
Thanks received: 213 times
OS: 8 Pro
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:29 pm 
For this post the author Mike has received gratitude : jumper918

I just got Comcast cable internet and picked up a Linksys CM100 for like $30 from Newegg. I connect it to a Linksys WRT54G wireless G-router with DD-WRT installed and everything works spectacularly well. I highly recommend this combination of devices. I know most cable providers use a Motorola Sufrboard cable modem, but I had to restart mine a lot when I had them. You can't really go wrong with Linksys.

+1 on the not getting a router/modem combination.



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Top Content Contributor
Top Content Contributor

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 11:28 am
Posts: 836
Thanks given: 9 times
Thanks received: 100 times
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
OS: 8 Pro
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 2:50 pm 
For this post the author sfeldner has received gratitude : jumper918

It's important to consider support as well. If you attach anything except your PC to the ISP-provided modem, the support buck stops there. If you have a problem with connections, the ISP will test their modem and say that everything is fine to their equipment and that if you want to continue to troubleshoot with their help, you will have to connect your PC directly to their modem. If you choose their wireless modem/router, they are fully responsible to help you with your problems - including wireless connection problems.

If you are worried about the quality or performance of the cable company's all-in-one box, don't be. We aren't talking about choosing/buying your own box with the pitfalls of unknown quality, features or compatibility. There box is 100% compatible with their system (duh) and consider that they have an installed user base of - what - 100,000... 200,000, a million?? IF there were a problem, I will guarantee that there are thousands of "expert level" users out there that are a lot bitchier than anyone on this forum and you can bet that they will have already pounded the cable company into submission and got the problems fixed. Also, microcode for the device (its operating system) is under the control of the cable company and they apply fixes that are needed based upon their troubleshooting - without having to prove anything to the router/modem's vendor. They say "do it" and it gets done - then it is downloaded and applied without you ever knowing it. Cable Internet is not in its infancy and the concerns about "Customer Prem" equipment here are valid ones but they really don't apply anymore.

Other options:
1) First off, you have a nice ADSL router with wireless already. You can connect one of the Ethernet ports to the basic cable modem and have three wired Ethernet ports (hopefully enough) and the same wireless you have already. Set up that port as a DMZ network and just leave the ADSL interface disconnected. Your network will be configured and work exactly as it did in the past when the ISP's connection was down and the modem will be isolated by the firewall in your modem/router, which will now just be a router. Of course this is the “no support” support model.

2) Or you can buy a new wireless router which would, considering my first option, only get you another port. If you are thinking about buying your own router/modem combination - don't. You really don't want to try to put a device containing a modem on the cable network. The cable company will make you jump through hoops.

3) Or, and this is the most radical… Don’t get cable Internet and stick with ADSL. It’s a long and technical explanation but I will try to make it short and understandable. Cable is a “shared” medium – true broadband.** That means that the packets you send and receive are carried (as a modulated RF signal) along the coaxial cable, out of your house, up to the pole and to every house on your segment, which is at least a city block***. To explain it in a VERY simple way, think of the cable in your house and up to the pole as a garden hose. It’s strung along on the telephone poles, or buried, with lobes or loops outward to every house. The hose comes down from the pole, to your modem – which we can think of as a faucet - back up the pole and to your neighbor’s “faucet”. Now, keeping in mind that your “segment” of the cable network is at least a city block and that something like 20 houses are all tapped into the same garden hose, when someone starts to access their connection, it’s like they open the faucet a little bit. The first guy that does this gets the connection or speed that the cable company sold him – let’s say 20mbs. Now, the next neighbor does the same but he gets a little less than what his connection was sold as – AND the first guy gets a little less too. This goes on and on. This can best be seen when you get home from work at 5:00pm and you jump on the computer – just like all the rest of your neighbors. Your surfing really sucks! If you get up at 3:00am and try the same surfing, it really blasts. That’s the problem with shared media and with cable Internet.

The DSL, in your case the ADSL (Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line) network is very much different, topographically. Simply again… It runs on your phone line and it goes up to the pole but that is where things are different. Each and every phone line, and hence DSL connection, is a “home run” to the phone company Central Office where it is connected to a port on a DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer). There is no shared media and you actually have a direct connection to the phone company’s network equipment. So, no shared media means no shared bandwidth which means the only data on your line is your own.

The one drawback of DSL is that it has a distance limitation that cable does not. You must be within 18 kilofeet (18kft = 18,000 feet = 3.41 miles)**** of the Central Office, along their cable (cable is laid in a grid with right angles, along streets, all neat and tidy, so it’s not 18,000 feet as the crow flies). Now 18kft is the outside limit and the speed is terrible at that length – probably 300 to 500kbs. However, many phone companies have or are installing fiber-optic equipment in neighborhoods which convert the telephone wire you have connected to your house to a fiber-optic “channel” back to the Central Office thereby eliminating the distance problems of the past. Speeds of 40mbs are common in this configuration and that speed does not very until you reach the “capital I” Internet. There you are at the mercy of trunks and connections at the website-end of the network.

You already have ADSL so you know you are within range. Unless you are going for some outrageously higher speed on cable than you had on DSL, you will probably be disappointed unless you normally do you surfing at 3 o’clock in the morning. And, if you have Vonage, some cable companies (read: Comcast… and there are others) intentionally “choke-down” and limit VoIP traffic so that Vonage quality sucks. However, they have a prioritized “channel” (VPN) for THEIR phone service – who’d a thunk?

** Note: Except for cable Internet (carried on coaxial cable) no other network type is “broadband”. Using the word broadband is a marketing faux pas that was widely adopted because it was a simple, one-word term that everyone could understand to be high-speed Internet. Prior to cable, xDSL, fiber-to-the-curb, etc., a 56k modem was called “High Speed Internet” by some. Those were the days!

*** Note: Yes, every packet you send and receive IS visible at the cable jack in your neighbor’s house; given that he has cable Internet (the RF signals for same are not filtered at the pole) and that he has a $100,000 analyzer with which to “sniff” the broadband signal and convert it back to data. Highly unlikely…

**** Note: Leave it up to the telephone company – actually AT&T – to come up with a unit of measure that combines English with Metric… Kilofeet… It’s 1000 feet and there 5.28 kft in a mile. Drop that tidbit at your next mixer and be the life of the party.


Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Established Member
Established Member

Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 2:45 pm
Posts: 11
Thanks given: 2 times
Thanks received: 4 times
Location: Minneapolis, MN
OS: Home Server
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 3:14 pm 

lol... I guess I never consider support anymore in my decisions because most "support" personnel just "support" my decision to not call them ever because they are useless. I just called my cable internet company, gave them the MAC address of my modem, and it worked. If it ever stops working, it's either an outage, my modem is broken, or an internal network problem (which can be troubleshot by simply plugging a PC directly into the modem and seeing if it works). The only support most of those people will give you is confirming your suspicion that there is an outage or send you a new modem because they claim yours is busted.

I've dealt with too many support people at AT&T and Qwest to ever believe they are more qualified than I am to troubleshoot any network problems.



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Top Content Contributor
Top Content Contributor

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 11:28 am
Posts: 836
Thanks given: 9 times
Thanks received: 100 times
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
OS: 8 Pro
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 3:53 pm 

I agree with Mike.
But in my case I do get decent tech support service from my provider.
Basically, when I call and have an internet problem, they simply ask for me to connect my modem directly to my computer and restart my modem (unplug-power wait a bit and plug the power back to it). So I see no problem for anyone to worry, if you choose the combo solution over your own. Also, with your own, you can upgrade your wireless. Most modem+router combo, are wireless G and low range. And if you are lucky to get Wireless N, it's a single antenna 2.4GHz, and not the real and full Wireless N with the 3 antenna (all 3 used for up/down transmission), or at least a dual one where 2 is for transmit and 1 for receiving. Basically, what I trying to say, is that, to keep cost at minimum, the wireless router in the modem combo, will be using a low end system. While if you purchase your router of your choice, you can pick what you want (low, medium, high range).


Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Frequent Member
Frequent Member

Joined: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:04 pm
Posts: 40
Thanks given: 2 times
Thanks received: 8 times
Location: Montreal
OS: 8 Pro
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:19 pm 

Thanks guys for all the help. From the top :D

Bugsy
Quote:
I think if your not happy with the basic one you get from service internet provider you may want look to get a new one not sure what your price range is but take a look at this if i understand what your asking i dont think it would benefit you in any way, if at all possible with the set up you are talking about.
Jumper is this what you were meaning here

Kinda looking at a N one at the moment but thanks. Your right thats what I meant on your second link.

Quote:
Bugsy, many ISP only provides you with a modem, which is, in my opinion, the best setup. As usually the routers+modem combo, usually the router is a joke.
Every router has it's strength or weaknesses. It is important to read reviews on the router. Some routers are better wired, other better on wireless, features.
Here is a review of yours: http://www.trustedreviews.com/networkin ... L-2740B/p1

GoodBytes - Now I'm kinda getting the feeling most of my previous router problems/range issues/drop out's were to do with the combos. I guess I never thought to read reviews on routers that much.

Quote:
I don't think you'll be able to link the Dlink 2740B to your new modem as it has an ASDL in (not Ethernet, which is what the modem you get from your provider will put out.)
You should pick up an inexpensive router and connect the router, via Ethernet, to your new cable modem. If they provide one, I would get a dedicated Modem from your provider and not a combo (as others have said, the combos don't perform that well.)

Rich - Ok, yeah I didn't think I would, makes sense. Have you got any recommendations for the wireless? Yeah the plan comes with a modem so that sounds like the best plan.

Quote:
I just got Comcast cable internet and picked up a Linksys CM100 for like $30 from Newegg. I connect it to a Linksys WRT54G wireless G-router with DD-WRT installed and everything works spectacularly well. I highly recommend this combination of devices. I know most cable providers use a Motorola Sufrboard cable modem, but I had to restart mine a lot when I had them. You can't really go wrong with Linksys.
+1 on the not getting a router/modem combination.

Mike - Why doesn't Australia get Newegg??? Always a pain to get decent cheap hardware here. See I would be happy with wireless G but seeing as my phone/cable plugs are at the other side of the house and I also do alot of gaming I need it to be N. Do you think the Motorola will be ok for a few months?

sfeldner - Ok quote would take up an entire page so think I'll just refer. Well to be honest where I am in Australia cable is very new and well as for the companies, they don't really care and give you the cheapest equipment for the highest cost. My first internet company charged me nearly $200 for a $90 combo. Also the troubleshooting I recieve is nearly always from India and I can barely understand them and well Mintywhite is tonnes more helpful than their troubleshooting anyday :D. I see what you're saying about ADSL vs. Cable. Now I am relatively far away from my exchange so my connection does suffer. Also my speed is atrocious and cable is guaranteeing me 30mbs when not throttled as apposed to the 5mbs that ADSL does. Another fact is that my neighbors are very low net users and can hardly use a computer so I doubt that them slowing me down will be too much trouble. Thanks for the post - learnt alot from it.

Quote:
lol... I guess I never consider support anymore in my decisions because most "support" personnel just "support" my decision to not call them ever because they are useless. I just called my cable internet company, gave them the MAC address of my modem, and it worked. If it ever stops working, it's either an outage, my modem is broken, or an internal network problem (which can be troubleshot by simply plugging a PC directly into the modem and seeing if it works). The only support most of those people will give you is confirming your suspicion that there is an outage or send you a new modem because they claim yours is busted.
I've dealt with too many support people at AT&T and Qwest to ever believe they are more qualified than I am to troubleshoot any network problems.

Mike - Pretty much the same here. Wouldn't call unless to attempt to get some compensation for the terrible service ;)

Quote:
I agree with Mike.
But in my case I do get decent tech support service from my provider.
Basically, when I call and have an internet problem, they simply ask for me to connect my modem directly to my computer and restart my modem (unplug-power wait a bit and plug the power back to it). So I see no problem for anyone to worry, if you choose the combo solution over your own. Also, with your own, you can upgrade your wireless. Most modem+router combo, are wireless G and low range. And if you are lucky to get Wireless N, it's a single antenna 2.4GHz, and not the real and full Wireless N with the 3 antenna (all 3 used for up/down transmission), or at least a dual one where 2 is for transmit and 1 for receiving. Basically, what I trying to say, is that, to keep cost at minimum, the wireless router in the modem combo, will be using a low end system. While if you purchase your router of your choice, you can pick what you want (low, medium, high range).

GoodBytes - Yeah I think I'll go with the separate idea. Seems easier to fix/upgrade and cost isn't as much for not enough.

Thank you all for you help, definitely helped me come to a decision.
Think I'll start off with the default Modem and a pretty good separate wireless router. Depending how the modem works I might upgrade it in a few months. In all practicality this is only for the 2 years until our "National Broadband Network" (fibre optic system) roll-out hits my area.
Lastly any suggestions on a wireless N, best range router for under $200 AUD ($192 USD, 123 Pounds)?
Thanks again for all the help.



_________________
Image
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Highly Valued Member
Highly Valued Member

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 1:45 am
Posts: 191
Thanks given: 38 times
Thanks received: 19 times
Location: Australia
OS: 8 RT
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
 
 Post subject: Re: New cable Hardware
New postPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 2:15 am 

Quote:
Think I'll start off with the default Modem and a pretty good separate wireless router

Just for kicks, before you open the box on your new router, try connecting your existing ADSL router via an Ethernet port (like I posted above) and see how it works. I, myself, don't mind spending money to get the "right" solution but I would also hate to "throw away" your ADSL router because it is such a nice unit.


Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
User avatar
Established Member
Established Member

Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 2:45 pm
Posts: 11
Thanks given: 2 times
Thanks received: 4 times
Location: Minneapolis, MN
OS: Home Server
 Profile E-mail  
 
Offline
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 1 of 2 [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 323 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  

cron